Armchair BEA Day Five: Ask the Experts


It's the last day of Armchair BEA and I have thoroughly enjoyed.  Visiting new blogs, engaging in Twitter conversations, "meeting" bloggers...it's all been great.  I'm so thankful to all the people who have stopped by my blog this week.  And on the last day we get to Ask the Experts.  Anything you want to know (or share) about blogging, now is the time.

So I have a question that has been bugging me for a while and I would love to get other book bloggers opinions on it.

If you have a policy stated on your blog that you are NOT currently accepting review copies, but publishers and authors send you an email pitch for their blog, how do you respond?  Do you ignore it and not give them a response?  Do you reply saying you aren't accepting copies right now?  


I look forward to hearing your responses!

Comments

  1. I try to respond to legitimate requests that have read my policies. I say that I don't read nonfiction or short stories, so if I get a request for those, I just delete it. If requests are unprofessional and just spam, I delete those too.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I tried not responding but only received another email 'in case you didn't receive the first'. Now I reply saying I'm not interested.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I will generally respond with a simple not interested if it is within my usual genres.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have in my policy that I don't accept review copies from authors directly. For me it really depends on what their pitch is like. If it's a generic spam-like email then I will just file it away. If it is thoughtful and relevant I will reply with a polite "no thank you" email, and just give them the benefit of the doubt about not seeing that part (or not reading) my policy.

    As for publicists and publishers, for those that need a response (some are of the sort where you go to a form if you're interested) I will reply one way or another.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have it in my review policy, also, that if I do not respond to a review request email, that they should take it as a no. I know it's a rough way to go, but it works. Hope you figure it out.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I used to ignore them since I have posted that I don't take review copies, but the last couple weeks I've gotten messages Cat described. I just said thanks, but no thanks.

    Now that I am thinking of it, I guess one could create a sort of formulaic email saying no to send off quickly. Off to go do that now before I forget!

    ReplyDelete
  7. My policy page currently states that I am not accepting review requests. For the few requests that I do still get, I respond with a short note that as per my policy page, I am not accepting review requests at this time.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well, I had an email just the other day saying "it says in your review policy that you don't accept ebooks at the moment but I'm hoping that moment has maybe passed?" Which I liked and I replied that the review policy was still valid, so I would not accept their book.

    I try to be friendly, but like your other commenters say, if it's a spammy kind of pitch with no reference to my name or my blog, I will delete it. Otherwise, I'll send a quick note back.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I currently have a not accepting review copies notice up and people ignore it and pitch me anyway. I don't usually respond them, but if it sounds really really good I'll forward the email to Serena.

    ReplyDelete

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