"Me To We: Finding Meaning in a Material World" by Craig and Marc Kielburger


I remember back when I was in high school, the newspaper was publishing articles about a local kid who had taken up the fight against child labour. He was 12 years old and upset after reading an article about the murder of a 12 year old boy in Pakistan who broke free of his own enslavement and crusaded against child labour.

The local boy then started a group at school that would fight for children's rights. Today that organization, Free The Children, is the world's largest network of children helping children with more than one million youth involved in over 45 countries.

Me to We is more than a book, it's a philosophy. It is the idea that one person and one change can make a big difference in our world. When we begin to look beyond "me" and work together as "we" big things can happen.

With personal stories from celebrities and everyday people who are working to make a difference, this book will inspire you to look out at the world and see how you can get involved to make a change. Whether it's right there in your neighbourhood or halfway across the world, it is easier to make a difference than you think. As Craig and Marc write in this book, once you begin the work to make the world better, you will find happiness and fulfillment in your own life.

I highly recommend this book to anyone, but especially to kids and their parents. Our children have the most potential for changing our world for the better. This book will show them that they don't have to let their age stand in the way of making a difference and that they can use their passions for good in this world.

Comments

  1. I love your blog!!!

    You are quickly populating my library list, thank-you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm so glad that I am of help!

    I have some great books in my pile to read so hopefully your library list will grow even more!

    ReplyDelete

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